Cuts and How to Make Them Stop Bleeding

Yunnan Bai Yao

If you’ve ever cut your finger preparing dinner, you know these are the cuts that never seem to stop bleeding. Maybe it’s because of the focused desire to finish the task once started, typically we’ll stop long enough to put a tight band-aid on it but continue chopping. If that doesn’t work, redressing with some gauze under the band-aid might do the trick, but it’s always these little cuts that evokes horror movie images of spurting blood. Don’t worry, we have a great medicine to recommend you have on hand. It’s famous for stopping bleeding, and you only need a tiny bit for it to work!

It’s called Yunnan Paiyao (or  sometimes “Baiyao”). This is a powder in a capsule, which you open and pour directly on the cut, then bandage with gauze. You’ll find that the bleeding stops immediately — AND the gauze did not get caught in the coagulating blood because the powdered herb layer captured the fibers instead.

 

Yunnan Paiyao came to recognition during the war in Vietnam. Legend has it that the tiny red pill stops gunshot wounds, yet no chemist has been able to isolate and identify what’s in it. The rest of the formula consists of herbs that simultaneously stop bleeding and heal wounds without stopping healthy blood flow: an interesting combination of properties, when you think about it. It is often recommended for use internally when undergoing surgery because of its multifaceted capability with blood.

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At Mountaintop Acupuncture, we have a combined 34 years of experience. To read more, please click here.

If you have questions and concerns about acupuncture treatment, we offer a free 20-minute phone session: click here for contact information to call or e-mail us.

We’re located in the DTC, in Centennial, near Greenwood Village, Englewood, and Cherry Hills, Colorado.

Insurance is welcome and accepted.

Speed Healing of Scratches & Burns

the_culprit

Guilty as charged! A few years ago, cat paw met side-of-face (ahem) in a moment of unhappiness: we were going on vacation and he was not happy about being left behind. The net result was a looong scratch below the right eye with a diagonal line to the right nostril.

Normally, not vain, the thought of having a permanent scar on my face made me (Carol) wary, until Tom reminded me to put some “burn cream” on it, Ching Wan Hung. This is kept on hand, for moxibustion, just in case a spark lets loose, which it rarely does. Hence why it was easily forgotten!

 

Within a week, the redness, pain, heat, and swelling of inflammation were greatly reduced.

The main ingredients in Ching Wan Hung are herbs from the category in our Materia Medica that are supposed to do reduce inflammation and speed healing. They have specific anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and wound-healing properties, which is why the cream is so effective. It is safe to use on scratched skin, but for open sores, wait until there’s a scab.

Herbs are nutrient substances made up of molecules of proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates, as well as minerals and vitamins. The body recognizes and readily absorbs these components, making them a safe and useful method for healing all sorts of conditions, both external and internal.

Over the years, I’ve given the burn cream to patients with wonderful results, when they, too, have met with accidents, so it’s a useful little tube to have on hand in your medicine cabinet or first-aid kit.

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At Mountaintop Acupuncture, we have a combined 34 years of experience. To read more, please click here.

If you have questions and concerns about acupuncture treatment, we offer a free 20-minute phone session: click here for contact information to call or e-mail us.

We’re located in the DTC, in Centennial, near Greenwood Village, Englewood, and Cherry Hills, Colorado.

Insurance is welcome and accepted.

Yin and Yang Theory in a Nutshell

photo courtesy of taoism.about.com

photo courtesy of taoism.about.com

The Yin and Yang Theory is the foundation of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). It is a simple concept of opposites, but can be somewhat complex when applying these principles to the human body and understanding its processes.

So here we go: in the macrocosm of the universe, Yin is the physical manifestation of all things and Yang is the potentiality of all things. In the microcosm, all physical forms are Yin, but all forms have the potential for change, which is Yang.

Sometimes the best way to explain a philosophical concept is with an analogy. A car’s engine is a static thing. The fuel that runs it is substantive, it is Yin. The spark that ignites the fuel is Yang, transforming the fuel (Yin) into energy to make the car run.

Now we’ll apply this analogy to the human body: the food we eat is Yin (substantive) and the process of digestion is Yang. Without the body’s ability to break down the food and water we intake into teeny tiny building blocks for metabolic function, the food is useless. It is within this transformative process that makes Yang complementary to Yin.

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At Mountaintop Acupuncture, we have over 30 years experience. To read more, please click here.

If you have questions and concerns about acupuncture treatment, we offer a free 20-minute phone session: click here for contact information to call or e-mail us.

We’re located in the DTC, in Centennial, near Greenwood Village, Englewood, and Cherry Hills, Colorado.

Insurance is welcome and accepted.

 

February is American Heart Month!

slideshow-visual-guide-to-heart-disease1Heart disease most commonly is an accumulation of unhealthy lifestyle choices and is therefore preventable. Heart disease is also treatable after the fact, with changes in diet and level of physical activity.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), heart disease represents one-sixth of the deaths in the U.S. each year, when there are 1,255,000 new or recurrent incidences of coronary attacks. These result in death 34 percent of the time — that’s 426,700 preventable deaths! Statistically, men are slightly more prone to heart disease than women, and roughly one-third of the U.S. population has some sort of cardiovascular disease.
Anatomy and Physiology of the Heart in a Nutshell:

  • The heart maintains the circulation of blood throughout the body.
  • The heart is a muscular pump divided into four chambers pumping blood: two in, two out.
  • The heart is located behind the sternum, slightly to the left of center in the chest, between the lungs.
  • The cardiac muscle is involuntary, which means it is not under conscious control.
  • Although it is innervated by the autonomic nervous system (ANS), the heart has an intrinsic conduction system controlling rhythm. The ANS controls the rate.

Additional factors influencing heart disease:

  • Chemicals can increase or decrease heart rate. For example, epinephrine released in response to stress will increase heart rate, an increase in calcium will strengthen cardiac muscle and increase heart rate, and an increase in both potassium and sodium can lower heart rate.
  • Temperature: Heat increases heart rate and cold decreases heart rate.
  • Emotions: Fear, anger, and anxiety are all stressors that increase heart rate.
  • Gender: Women’s hearts beat faster.

Diseases of the Heart in a Nutshell

  • Birth defects: many corrected with surgical intervention.
  • Electrical conduction (arrythmias): second most common cause, affecting the valves. Very treatable with drugs and interventions that reset rhythm.
  • Blood circulation (coronary): caused due to blockage in the heart’s blood vessels. Majority of heart disease, divided into two main types, treated with surgery and drugs:
  1. Angina Pectoris occurs over time with decreased oxygen supply to the cardiac muscle, weakening the muscle cells. Stress and physical exertion after a heavy meal are the major causes. Chest pain is the chief complaint.
  2. Myocardial Infarction is a heart attack due to the death of tissue, causing loss of muscle strength and ability to function at all.
  • Infection: bacteria, virus, fungus, or parasite affect one of the three layers of the heart tissue (pericardium, myocardium, endocardium).

Signs and Symptoms in a Nutshell

Electrical System Malfunction

  • Sudden loss of responsiveness
  • Erratic breathing
  • Treatment: CPR and ER defibrillator
  • Occurrence: 295,000 per year in the U.S.; 95 percent die before reaching the hospital.

Blood Supply Blockage

  • Chest discomfort: pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain.
  • Discomfort in other areas of the body: one or both arms, back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  • Others: cold sweat, nausea, lightheaded. Additionally, in women, heart flutters, fatigue, cough, loss of appetite, and heartburn are symptoms that should be taken seriously if they persist.

What You Can Do to Prevent Heart Disease

Many forms of heart disease can be prevented or treated with healthy lifestyle choices:

  • MOVE: a minimum of moderate exercise 30 minutes a day, 3-5 times per week.
  • EAT WELL: quality nutrition to lower cholesterol and blood pressure:
  1. Consume more plant food as grains, vegetables, fruit, beans and legumes.
  2. Consume healthy oils as seeds and nuts, and cook with cold-pressed, extra-virgin olive oil.
  3. Consume alcohol in moderation: 1 drink per day for women, 2 drinks for men.
  • QUIT SMOKING
  • REDUCE STRESS

At Mountaintop Acupuncture, we help you implement these preventive measures as our provided standard of care.

In the U.S. in 2011, people on the whole don’t yet know acupuncture and its herbal medicine is a proven, successful intervention that can treat many diseases before they have gone too far.

While it is imperative you visit your western medicine doctor, eastern medicine is there for you to take advantage of. If you catch symptoms as they arise and before they take hold, you can avoid ever having a confirmed diagnosis!

At Mountaintop Acupuncture, we focus on your diet and encourage exercising as part of your treatment. We can also help you reduce stress and quit smoking, acting as advocates by exploring ways to cope with life’s curves with you, to prevent heart disease altogether.

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At Mountaintop Acupuncture, we have a combined 34 years of experience. To read more, please click here.

If you have questions and concerns about acupuncture treatment, we offer a free 20-minute phone session: click here for contact information to call or e-mail us.

We’re located in the DTC, in Centennial, near Greenwood Village, Englewood, and Cherry Hills, Colorado.

Insurance is welcome and accepted.

 

HIT Medicine Treats Your Injuries & Bruises with Chinese herbs

hit medicine
Bruises are the breaking of the superficial blood vessels (capillaries), usually due to a trauma. Blood leaks into the surrounding tissue, causing a bluish discoloration, and the area tends to be painful and swollen. Over the course of two to three weeks, the bruise goes through a change of color from reddish to blue to yellowish-green before it looks normal again.

In Chinese medicine, bruises from injuries are considered blood stagnation or stasis, and certain acupuncture points are good to break up these blockages. External applications of herbs help move the blood, which speeds up the healing process of these bruises.

As a practitioner who deals with sports-related injuries every day, I (Tom) find that herbal formulas for external use are invaluable to the active individual to help speed up the healing process and enhance their athletic performance.

Some individuals tend to bruise easily for a variety of reasons. For example: the elderly, because their blood vessels are more fragile, and they take blood-thinning medication such as Warfarin or Coumadin. People who take a lot of over-the-counter, non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory medications may also be susceptible, for these drugs decrease the clotting ability of the blood. These are aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and naproxen (Aleve). Other prescription drugs, such as Prednisone, also will thin the blood.

When someone comes in for treatment and they tend to bruise easily, we go through their medication history to see whether they are on any of the medications mentioned above, and then we treat the body’s ability to contain the blood with acupuncture and herbal formulas.

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At Mountaintop Acupuncture, we have a combined 34 years of experience. To read more, please click here.

If you have questions and concerns about acupuncture treatment, we offer a free 20-minute phone session: click here for contact information to call or e-mail us.

We’re located in the DTC, in Centennial, near Greenwood Village, Englewood, and Cherry Hills, Colorado.

Insurance is welcome and accepted.